Big Business

Big Business

How Long

Copyright 1981, Armando Celaya, with collaboration from John Clancy, Rich Hunter, Tim Jeffries, Chuck Buchannon

Song performed by Armando Celaya on Lead Vocal, Rich Hunter on Guitars and Vocals, John Clancy on Keyboards, Chuck Buchannon on Bass Guitar, Tim Jeffries on Percussion.

Engineering by Steve McDonald, at Wattever Recorders in Van Nuys CA, early 1981.

How Long


(1981) We were rehearsing at our bass player Chuck Buchannon's home studio in the hills of Encino, which was nice in that an adjoining room had this grand piano, so we could do vocal rehearsals, work on harmonies. Mondo had been contributing to our songs up until this point, but this was the first time he submitted a song of his own for consideration. Mondo could play the piano, but for some reason I seem to recall that he hummed this one to us, and we sort of stumbled around with ideas until we did something that matched the sound he heard in his head. So, I give the band collaboration credit, even though this was certainly Mondo's song, start to finish. We were sort of shooting for an Alan Parsons / Abbey Road / Argent / Supertramp / Ambrosia vibe on this one, we probably ended up with something else altogether, and that's ok too. I can still remember writing the mini-moog solo while sitting on the floor, at my music room on Napa, the day before going in to do the overdubs. Nothing like a deadline, to focus one's atttention.

Magic Eyes

Copyright 1979, Rich Hunter & John Clancy with collaboration from Mondo Celaya and Tim Jeffries

Song performed by Armando Celaya on Lead Vocal, Rich Hunter on Guitars and Vocals, John Clancy on Keyboards, Dean Foster on Bass Guitar, Tim Jeffries on Percussion.

Engineering by Steve McDonald, at Wattever Recorders in Van Nuys CA, 1980.

Magic Eyes


(1980) The divorce settlement between Rich & Philo, from the Coup d'Etat band split up, specified that Philo would get "Cat Fight", and what became "Let's Have a War" with FEAR, and Rich would retain the rights to "Magic Eyes". We certainly did use the bones of the earlier version, which borrowed liberally from Handel's Sarabande. I recall sitting with Rich in the middle entry way music room at Hell House, where I had squeezed in an old upright piano, with Rich learning the song, very early in the Big Business project, and making some contributions with modality, and dropping some beats here and there. It is my recollection that while the title was pre-existing, that I wrote the words...this is contradicted somewhat by Rich's better memory as to what the words actually are - I thought I "wrote" the words "coldest skies", while Rich recalls the words "cold disguise" - which makes way more sense, in context. I do know who I had in mind as I wrote the words, a certain local "muse/sprite" that had taken it upon himself to become "life coach" to all the lazy hippie types that he had surrounded himself with in the late 70's. An "inspirit" is term I coined for an annoying yet inspirational presence. It has yet to catch on.


Deadly Diner

Copyright 1979, Rich Hunter, John Clancy, Tim Jeffries, Dean Foster

Instrumental performed by Rich Hunter on Guitars and Vocals, John Clancy on Keyboards, Dean Foster on Bass Guitar, Tim Jeffries on Percussion.

Engineering - such as it is - by the band, on a Tascam 4 track at Dennis Wageman's Rehearsal Studio, North Hollywood, CA

Deadly Diner


(1979) BONUS TRACK - An unfinished song, included here with the clams, if only to document the back & forth solo work between myself on mini moog and Rich Hunter on his Gibson ES-335 guitar, after about the half way marker. Song title was inspired by a particularly bad case of indegestion that drummer Tim acquired, after eating a midnight meal at a local "open all night" diner. I think we made up a pseudo name for the diner so we wold not get sued, but now I cannot remember which name was real and which one we made up, so Deadly Diner it is.


For Mom

Copyright 1979, Rich Hunter, John Clancy, Tim Jeffries, Dean Foster

Instrumental performed by Rich Hunter on Guitars and Vocals, John Clancy on Keyboards, Dean Foster on Bass Guitar, Tim Jeffries on Percussion.

Engineering - such as it is - by the band, on a Tascam 4 track at Dennis Wageman's Rehearsal Studio, North Hollywood, CA

For Mom


(1979) BONUS TRACK - Another unfinished song, included here because...well, I am not sure why, but for some reason Tim thought his mom would really like this one, maybe because he planned to add a drum solo in the middle someday. Maybe because of the heavy metal disco beat we added, and no, don't ask me why I am playing the theme for Star Wars on a mellotron over the disco beat. There may have been alchohol involved. But there is a pretty nice guitar solo from Rich in there, and you can hear a few spots where the gang locks in.


The Shed

Copyright 1979, Rich Hunter, John Clancy, Tim Jeffries, Dean Foster

Instrumental performed by Rich Hunter on Guitars and Vocals, John Clancy on Keyboards, Dean Foster on Bass Guitar, Tim Jeffries on Percussion.

Engineering - such as it is - by the band, on a Tascam 4 track at Dennis Wageman's Rehearsal Studio, North Hollywood, CA

The Shed


(1979) BONUS TRACK - We have already established Tim's healthy obsession with Baseball; Football however, we would need to place in the "unhealthy" obsession column. Case in point would be the Super Bowl party with the unhappy ending, either a Rams loss or a Raiders win, that pushed the obsessive, compulsive, neatnick Tim past his breaking point, after which he needed to relieve the anguish, and unload it on someone, or something. He may have been drinking. He found his way to his landlord's backyard, somehow, and his gaze affixed to a helpless, outdoor metal tool shed, which he reckoned to be unnacceptably offensive. The short version is, that Shed ceased to be, that Super Sunday, as with only his bare fists did Tim rudely disassemble the enclosure, monstrosity that it was, and the next morning it lay in a rubble of twisted metal, never to recover, or be anything useful again. His knuckles were bloody and scraped, and he was in pain, so he suspected that he might be involved, himself. Somehow though, on some level, he must have felt better about the football game, and so it was a good thing that the Shed was there that night, or things certainly could have gotten... ugly. This song, inspired by that story, we more or less dedicated to finding an outlet, when one is needed. The crowd noise is simulated, but the rage is real. Rock on, Tim.